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Math and Nonfiction, Grades K–2

$32.95
SKU
9780941355612

Math and Nonfiction, Grades K–2 provides 18 lessons that inspire students to explore geometric shapes in their everyday lives, investigate measurement, collect and organize data, compute with coins, learn how to tell time, and more.


Download an at-a-glance chart of children’s literature featured in the Math, Literature, and Nonfiction series, listed with grade levels and topics.

Jamee Petersen
144 Pages

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Author Bio

Jamee Petersen, a teacher of multiage children in suburban Minneapolis, has more than twenty years of classroom experience. She is an educational consultant in Minnesota at the local, state, and national levels and has served as a Math Solutions consultant.

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Jamee Petersen, a teacher of multiage children in suburban Minneapolis, has more than twenty years of classroom experience. She is an educational consultant in Minnesota at the local, state, and national levels and has served as a Math Solutions consultant.

Review by Connect Staff. Reproduced with permission from Connect, September–October 2005.

Math and Nonfiction: Grades K–2 , by Jamee Peterson and Math and Nonfiction: Grades 3–5, by Stephanie Sheffield and Kathleen Gallagher, are two of a series of books from Marilyn Burns’ Math Solutions group. They promote the idea that, “children’s books can be effective vehicles for motivating children to think and reason mathematically.” (p. xi). Nonfiction books offer children a different way of listening when the stories are read aloud, and a different way of interacting with a book. Instead of reading from cover to cover, one might only read a portion of the nonfiction book. Each lesson is conveyed in a controversial tone, with plenty of reflective narration from the author. As well, children’s drawings and quotes from journal entries and discussions are prominent. Each lesson describes detailed steps and suggestions. In short, these are of the same fine caliber we have grown to expect from Math Solutions. 220 pages.





Review by Mary Ellen Bardsley, Ph.D candidate at the University of Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, and an Assistant Professor in the College of Education, Niagara University, Niagara, NY. From the Fall 2005 issue of Intersection, a newsletter of the ExxonMobil Corporation and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM). Reprinted with permission from Intersection, © 2005, by ExxonMobil Corporation.

Many early childhood teachers continuously seek out books to use in their classrooms. Using books to introduce and support themes is comfortable for most early childhood teachers. Many of these teachers are not as comfortable with mathematics. Math and Nonfiction Grades K–2 provides mathematics lessons that begin with nonfiction reading.

The book includes an introduction by Marilyn Burns, in which she cites two reasons for encouraging the use of nonfiction books for math lessons. First, she feels books are an “effective vehicle for motivating children to think and reason mathematically.” Second, children need to use different skills when listening to nonfiction. They need to pay attention to relevant facts and then integrate and connect them to prior knowledge. I would add an additional reason for using nonfiction—their use can be motivating for teachers. Using nonfiction books allows the integration of mathematics and other subjects, setting mathematical concepts in real world contexts.

This book contains lessons based on 18 nonfiction titles which cover a range of mathematical concepts including shapes, measurement, Roman Numerals, time, and data. The lessons are divided among the targeted grades, with each lesson containing a brief description of the book’s content and a list of needed materials. Blackline masters for student recording sheets are included. The kindergarten teachers I shared the book with were excited about using nonfiction books. They previously thought this genre would not be motivating for their students, but the descriptions of lively classrooms dialogues changed their minds. These teachers appreciated the examples of children’s work. Their only negative comment was that they needed to reread the descriptions of classroom implementation in order to find the procedures for the lessons. They suggested that an outline of the lesson follow the descriptions of the classroom.

One teacher adapted the suggested activities for The Wing of a Flea: A Book about Shapes by Ed Emberly. The book demonstrates how shapes can be found on everyday objects. After listening to the story, the kindergarteners completed sentence strips such as “A triangle could be ______________,” creating pictures to illustrate their sentences. Children began noticing shapes throughout the building and neighborhood. This delighted the teacher, though she mentioned that walking anywhere was taking twice as long since the children observed shapes everywhere!

This book would make an excellent resource for teachers. It provides models for incorporating nonfiction books into math lessons and encourages the search for additional titles to support and enrich mathematics instruction.






Review by Colleen Thrailkill, resource teacher for gifted and talented, Davidson Elementary School, Davidson, NC. Reprinted with permission from Teaching Mathematics in the Middle School, © 2005 by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. All rights reserved.

As soon as I saw that these books came from Marilyn Burns’s Math Solutions Publications, I was eager to use them and to share them with the teachers at my school. The K–2 book presents lessons built around the mathematics in eighteen children’s books of nonfiction. The 3–5 book does the same for twenty works of nonfiction appropriate for the upper elementary grades. As is typical of most of the material from Marilyn Burns and her associates, these books provide detailed descriptions of the lessons as they were presented to actual classes, children’s comments and responses during the lessons, and photographs of student work samples. Lists of materials also accompany each lesson, and black line masters are included as needed.
 
I asked a teacher friend to field-test the 3–5 book. She used the lesson for If You Hopped Like a Frog, giving her multiage class of third and fourth graders a chance to work on their multiplication and measurement-conversion skills. She reported that her students enjoyed predicting before hearing the text that came on the next page. Differentiating the lesson for her students of varying abilities was easy, and in her class discussion after the lesson students reported that the activities they did were challenging and fun.
 
These books will be a welcome addition to the collections of mathematics lessons using fiction books that have come into increasing use as teachers have integrated their curriculum more over the past ten years. Teaching students how to read nonfiction is an important skill, and linking it to mathematics is very relevant. In addition, most publications linking mathematics and literature have been written for the lower elementary grades. The 3–5 book in this series is an excellent opportunity for us to reach our older students and make an engaging link between good mathematics and good literature.

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Through popular nonfiction books, teachers can easily engage students in real-world mathematical problem solving.

Big and Little
by Jamee Petersen

More than One
by Jamee Petersen

My Map Book
by Jamee Petersen

Notice: Online credit card and debit card transactions are currently disabled. Please call 877.234.7323 or visit Amazon.com for credit card and debit card purchases. Purchase order transactions are active during this time for institutions with purchase order accounts.

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